Rosalie Woodruff calls on DPIPWE after 5000 animals were killed by golf clubs | The Examiner

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  Rosalie Woodruff calls on DPIPWE after 5000 animals were killed by golf clubs |  The Examiner

News, local news, golf, club, cull, harvest, shelter, dpipwe, cull, golf club

The Tasmanian Greens have tapped the government after The Examiner reported revelations showing that Tasmanian golf clubs had killed over 5,000 animals since 2016. After data was released by the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, 22 active pesticides have been held by golf clubs and 121 have been on display since 2016, said Green Party environmental spokeswoman Dr. Rosalie Woodruff, a study into wildlife management and protection. IN OTHER NEWS: An ancient palawa tradition is lost and an entire community is concerned “We need a wildlife survey in Tasmania for management and conservation. There are just so many unanswered questions and so much opacity, ”she said. Over 4,000 wallabies and possums and 413 native chickens, 405 wood ducks, 52 galahs and 19 plovers were recorded during the culling. “This is a terrifying number of animals, and particularly birds, that are slaughtered on golf courses every year,” said Dr. Woodruff. “And they are backed and supported by an old-fashioned, outdated approach to wildlife management.” Dr. Woodruff said she was particularly concerned about how the department got the bird population information to assess whether a permit would have an impact on native wildlife. “We don’t have good population information for native chickens, plovers, galahs and sulfur-capped cockatoos in Tasmania,” she said. “We don’t understand what the department uses for the criteria to distribute these permits. It seems like anyone who asks for them gets one.” When they have transparent data, let’s see what they are. ” to make their decisions. ” Dr. Woodruff no longer called for phytosanitary permits to be banned, but said they must be “closely and closely monitored”, with “strong evidence” required of the permits. To apply for a permit, the applicant must provide background information, including the type of wildlife proposed, the damage they allegedly caused, and any previous control measures. DPIPWE says permits are only issued after a rigorous assessment of damage, alternative management measures, and biodiversity, and requirements for compliance with animal welfare and hat audits are carried out “where necessary” to ensure that permit conditions are met. Read More “DPIPWE conducts annual spotlight surveys across the state to monitor population trends in a number of species. This information is an important part of the permit process to ensure that a species is managed sustainably, ”they said. They said golf clubs have not been sanctioned for phytosanitary permit violations since 2016. What do you think? Send us a letter to the editors:

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July 13, 2021 – 9:30 a.m.

After data was released by the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment showing that 22 active crop protection products were operated by golf clubs and 121 have been released since 2016, Greens environmental spokeswoman Dr. Rosalie Woodruff, a study into wildlife management and protection.

“We need a wildlife survey in Tasmania, in terms of management and conservation. There are just so many unanswered questions and so much opacity, ”she said.

Over 4,000 wallabies and possums and 413 native chickens, 405 wood ducks, 52 galahs and 19 plovers were recorded during the culling.

“This is a terrifying number of animals, and particularly birds, that are slaughtered on golf courses every year,” said Dr. Woodruff.

“And they are backed and supported by an old-fashioned, outdated approach to wildlife management.”

Dr. Woodruff said she was particularly concerned about how the department got the bird population information it used to assess whether a permit would have an impact on native wildlife.

“We don’t have good population information for native chickens, plovers, galahs and sulfur-capped cockatoos in Tasmania,” she said.

“We don’t understand what the department uses for the criteria to distribute these permits. It seems that anyone who asks for them gets one.

“When they have transparent data, we want to see what they are using to make their decisions.”

Dr. Woodruff no longer called for the ban on phytosanitary permits, saying they need to be “closely and closely monitored” with “strong evidence” that the permits are required.

To apply for a permit, the applicant must provide background information, including the types of intended wildlife, the damage they are believed to have caused, and any previous control measures taken.

According to DPIPWE, permits are only issued after a rigorous assessment of damage, alternative management measures, biodiversity and animal welfare requirements, and hat audits are carried out “where necessary” to ensure that the permit conditions are met.

When Department Secretary Tim Baker was asked how many audits of phytosanitary golf clubs had been conducted by the department, a DPIPWE spokesman responded.

“DPIPWE conducts annual spotlight surveys across the state to monitor population trends in a number of species. This information is an important part of the permit process to ensure that a species is managed sustainably, ”they said.

They said golf clubs have not been sanctioned for violating phytosanitary permits since 2016.

What do you think? Send us a letter to the editors:

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