Hansen’s Hundred, No.49: Golf pioneer Dell Urich made the sport a success in Tucson | Greg Hansen

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  Hansen's Hundred, No.49: Golf pioneer Dell Urich made the sport a success in Tucson |  Greg Hansen



Urich planted dozens of trees – many of them still standing – in what is now called Randolph North. He was involved in all aspects of the growth of Tucson golf, which grew from three courses in the 1930s to over 30 when Urich died of cancer in 1995.

He even named the course in 1940.

“People called the pro shop and Dell, usually the only employee in the pro shop, replied, ‘The Municipal Golf Course of Tucson,’” recalled his widow Dorothy Urich in 1995. “He didn’t think that was appropriate. So he started calling it Randolph Golf Course. He had studied the history of the property. It was donated by a railroad magnate, Espes Randolph, who donated the land to the city and stipulated that it could only be used for parks and recreation.

“It wasn’t long before everyone started calling him Randolph Golf Course.”

Golf in Tucson grew rapidly after World War II. Urich began making drawings of new 18 holes and modeling the proposed greens from clay. In 1958 the city council approved a new course and named it Randolph South. It opened in December 1959.

In the 1980s and 1990s, Golf Magazine published figures that Tucson’s first 36-hole golf complex, partly created by Dell Urich, was America’s second largest golf course with over 100,000 rounds per year.

After Urich’s death, the city council rebuilt Randolph South and changed its name to Dell Urich Golf Course. It is the most played urban course in Tucson.

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