How Abraham Ancer made it to the PGA Tour of Mexico without professional coaching

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How Abraham Ancer made it to the PGA Tour of Mexico without professional coaching

It takes years to be successful in sports, mostly due to intense training and talent. Some athletes stay with a coach or trainer for years and perfect their craft. Most of the time, however, a successful athlete brings an inspiring story that goes back to their roots and raw talent. The same goes for Abraham Ancer, who made it to the PGA Tour from a small town in Mexico.

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Review of Abraham Ancer’s trip to the PGA Tour

Ancer turned pro in 2013 and began playing on the PGA Tour in 2016. Born in McAllen, Texas, the 30-year-old actually grew up in a Mexican town called Reynosa. Speaking to Golf Digest earlier this year, Ancer took a look back at his journey and remembered the young self who saw the PGA Tour as something unattainable.

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Like most golfers, Abraham Ancer dreamed of playing professionally. However, he realized his dream and turned professional after graduating from college in Odessa.

How did Ancer start his golf trip?

Ancer’s father introduced him to golf at a young age and brought him to Club Campestre de Reynosa. “There are pictures of me in diapers out there. I hit balls with him as soon as I got up. ”Ancer’s father was the one who invested in his career, and the golfer was deposed when his father died before his career began.

Despite being from a small town in Mexico, Ancer admits that his support system has been incredible. Getting on the PGA Tour was a big deal for them. “I received an awful lot of text messages and on social media telling me how proud they were of me for making my country known in the golf world.”

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games – Golf – Men’s Singles – Final – Round 4 – Kasumigaseki Country Club – Kawagoe, Saitama, Japan – August 1, 2021. Abraham Ancer of Mexico in action. REUTERS / Toby Melville

When he was 15, he moved to Mission in Texas for high school in the hopes that playing in the US would eventually help him play college golf. However, Ancer announced that he was not being recruited that highly for college golf and it was Paul Chavez of Odessa Junior College who told him he could move to Division I.

“My game is definitely homemade. When I was a little kid there were two or three professionals who taught me the basics of the game, but after that I just kept playing on my own. I’ve never really had a swing trainer. I still don’t ”.

How did Ancer’s game grow in college?

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